Simple Tips for Healthy Lifestyle

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The phrase ‘healthy lifestyle’ is an abbreviated definition of how you should live if you want to get the healthiest body you can one that both looks good and feels good. You know the obvious behaviors that describe someone who is healthy and takes care of themselves. A healthy person doesn’t smoke, tries to maintain a healthy weight, eats healthy foods with plenty of fruits, vegetables and fiber and, of course,excercise on regular basis.

Then there are other elements to add to the list. A healthy person also knows how to manage stress, gets good quality sleep each night, doesn’t drink too much, doesn’t sit too much basically, does everything in moderation all the time. When you look at everything that could possibly go into a healthy lifestyle, you can see just how hard all of those things are in our current world.

The good news is, you don’t have to change everything at the same time. In fact, the trick to healthy living is making small changes taking more steps each day, adding fruit to your cereal, having an extra glass of water, or saying no to that second helping of buttery mashed potatoes. One thing you can do right now to make your lifestyle healthier is to move more.

WHY WE NEED TO MOVE MORE?

A good starting goal is at least 150 minutes a week, but if you don’t want to sweat the numbers, just move more! Find forms of exercise you like and will stick with, and build more opportunities to be active into your routine.

HERE ARE SOME TIPS TO MOVE MORE:
The good news is that adding more movement is often easier than you think. Even relatively small amounts of extra movement can make big impacts on your long-term health, which is awesome!

MOVE MORE AT THE OFFICE
1. Get a standing desk (and actually use it!). Here are some standing desk tip. take it            slow, stand with care, chooce the right shoes, set it up right and move a lot,to make it        more body friendly – because just switching from sitting to standing isn’t necessarily          going to help you that much.
2. Schedule walking meetings and phone calls. Sometimes you need a boardroom and            sometimes you don’t! If you don’t, instead of sitting down at a coffee shop, go for a            walk while you talk!
3. Take frequent eye breaks. Every 20 minutes or so look out of a window for 20 seconds.
4. Transition out of your high heels into minimal shoes.
5. Plan movement breaks into your work schedule. Even a 2 minute break every hour can        make a big difference to your body! Set an alarm or try using the promodoro                      productivity techniques Use your break time to stretch, especially your shoulders, hips        and core.

MOVE MORE AT HOME
1. Try Less furniture! Skipping furniture is an amazing way to gain strength and mobility          without taking any extra time in your day. It’s also free and easy!
2. Plan family movement activities for your free time. For instance, take your kids to the          park and play on the monkey bars and climbing structures with them. Or go for more          hikes (and try balancing on logs and climbing trees). If you live in the city, create a            garden or join a community group that gardens or picks unwanted fruit.
3. Schedule movement into your chores. For instance, by walking to the store whenever          possible, folding your laundry by squatting or kneeling on the floor, or shoveling snow        by hand.
4. When you drive your kids to school, park early maybe a mile away. Then walk them to        school and walk back to your car. Movement for all of you!
5. Plan a movement friendly work wardrobe that allows you to stretch, climb and move          and which doesn’t compress your midsection.

A BENEFITS BY MOVING MORE:
The great thing about moving is that just a few minutes a day can have lasting benefits, many of which you may not even be aware of.

  • Improves mood and reduce symptoms of anxiety and  depression
  • Enhances self-esteem
  • Improves memory in elderly people
  • Reduces stress
  • Increases and improves range of motion
  • Helps maintain flexibility as you age
  • Maintains bone mass & Improves joint stability
  • Prevents osteoporosis and fractures
  • Reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes15 TIPS TO GET MORE HEALTHIER LIFESTYLE

    1. THINK POSITIVE AND FOCUS ON GRATITUDE
    Research shows a healthy positive attitude helps build a healthier immune system          and boosts overall health. Your body believes what you think, so focus on the                positive.

    2. EAT YOUR VEGETABLES
    Shoot for five servings of vegetables a day raw, steamed, or stir-fried. A diet high          in vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of developing cancers of the lung,            colon, breast, cervix, esophagus, stomach, bladder, pancreas, and ovaries. And many      of the most powerful phytonutrients are the ones with the boldest colors  such as            broccoli, cabbage, carrots, tomatoes, grapes, and leafy greens.
    3. SET A 5 MEAL IDEAL
    What, when, and how much you eat can keep both your metabolism and your energy      levels steadily elevated, so you’ll have more all-day energy. A “5 meal ideal” will help      you manage your weight, keep your cool, maintain your focus, and avoid cravings.
    4. EXCERCISE DAILY
    Did you know that daily exercise can reduce all of the biomarkers of aging? This             includes improving eyesight, normalizing blood pressure, improving lean muscle,             lowering cholesterol, and improving bone density. If you want to live well and live           longer, you must exercise! Studies show that even ten minutes of exercise makes a         difference  so do something! Crank the stereo and dance in your living room. Sign up     for swing dancing or ballroom dancing lessons. Walk to the park with your kids or a         neighbor you’d like to catch up with. Jump rope or play hopscotch. Spin a hula hoop.       Play water volleyball. Bike to work. Jump on a trampoline. Go for a hike
    5. GET A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP
    If you have trouble sleeping, try relaxation techniques such as meditation and yoga        Or eat a small bedtime snack of foods shown to help shift the body and mind into            sleep mode: whole grain cereal with milk, oatmeal, cherries, or chamomile tea.              Darken your room more and turn your clock away from you. Write down worries or        stressful thoughts to get them out of your head and onto the page. This will help you      put them into perspective so you can quit worrying about them.
    6. CHECK YOUR FOOD TUDE
        What we eat and how we feel are linked in very complex ways. A healthy approach to      eating is centered on savoring flavor, eating to satisfaction, and increasing energy,          rather than focusing on weight. Check your balance of low-calorie foods, nutrient-          dense foods (providing many nutrients per calorie), and foods that are calorie dense      but nutrient poor. Most Americans need to eat more fresh whole foods (in contrast to      processed, highly refined foods). Try to add more whole grains, fresh fruits and              vegetables, and legumes into your meals. Pair these carbohydrate-rich foods with a        healthy fat or lean protein to extend satisfaction.
    7. EAT LIKE A KID
        If adding more fruits and vegetables sounds ominous, look to “finger food” versions        that preschool kids love carrot and celery sticks, cherry tomatoes, broccoli florets,          grapes, berries, and dried fruits. All are nutritional powerhouses packed                        with antioxidants.
    8. BE A PICKY EATER
        Limit saturated fats and trans fats, and aim to eat more foods rich in anti-                      inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids to cut your risk of cardiovascular disease and              maybe even improve depressed moods. The equivalent of just one gram of EPA/DHA      (eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid) daily is recommended. Eating cold-          water oily fish (wild salmon, herring, sardines, trout) two to three times per week          will provide both EPA and DHA. Adding up to two tablespoons of ground flaxseed and      eating meat, milk, and cheese from grass-fed animals will provide you with a healthy      dose of omega-3s.
    9. USE FOODS OVER SUPPLEMENTS
        Supplements are not a substitute for a good diet. Although many health experts            recommend taking a multivitamin and mineral supplement that provides 100 to 200        percent of your recommended daily value, each and every supplement should be            carefully evaluated for purity and safety. Specific supplements have been associated        with toxicity, reactions with medications, competition with other nutrients, and even        increased risk of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes.
    10. GET SATISFACTION
        Both eating and physical activity are fun, sensory experiences! In both, aim for              pleasure not pain. Pay attention to the nutritional value of the foods you choose to          eat, as well as your sense of satisfaction, relaxation, tension, exhilaration, and                fatigue when you sit down to eat. Check in with yourself as you eat, rekindling your        recognitions of hunger,fullness, and satisfaction when considering when and how            much to eat.
    11. GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK
       “I spend countless hours doing cardio and never seem to lose that last ten pounds!” is      a common complaint I hear from clients. Give yourself permission to shorten your          workout. Believe it or not, overtraining could be the problem. Your body can plateau        if not given adequate rest to restore itself, ultimately leading to a decline in                    performance. Fatigue, moodiness, lack of enthusiasm, depression, and increased           cortisol (the “stress” hormone) are some hallmarks of overtraining syndrome.                 Creating a periodization program breaking up your routine into various training modes     can help prevent overtraining by building rest phases into your regimen. For example,     you might weight train on Monday and Wednesday, cycle on Tuesday and Thursday,         run on Friday and rest on Saturday and Sunday. You can also help balance your             program by simply incorporating more variety.
    12. THINK SMALL
       Often the biggest deterrent to improving health is feeling overwhelmed by all the           available advice and research. Try to focus first on one small, seemingly                         inconsequential, unhealthy habit and turn it into a healthy, positive habit. If you’re in     the habit of eating as soon as you get home at night, instead, keep walking shoes in       the garage or entryway and take a quick spin around the block before going inside. If     you have a can of soda at lunchtime every day, have a glass of water two days a             week instead. Starting with small, painless changes helps establish the mentality that     healthy change is not necessarily painful change. It’s easy to build from here by             adding more healthy substitutions.
    13. KEEP GOOD COMPANY
       You can do all the right things  but if you have personal relationships with people who     have unhealthy habits, it is often an uphill battle. The healthiest people are those who     have relationships with other healthy people. Get your family or friends involved with     you when you walk or plan healthier meals. Making healthy changes with a loved one     can bring you closer together as well as motivate you.
    14. MAKE A LIST AND CHECK IT TWICE
       Take a few minutes and write down all the reasons you can’t begin an exercise               program. Then look at the basis of each reason. For instance, if you wrote, “No time”     as one of your reasons, then perhaps that’s based on a belief that an exercise                 program  takes a lot of time. Starting with even five minutes a day will have a               positive effect because you will have created a healthy habit where one didn’t exist         before, and that’s a powerful mental adjustment. A closer look at your list will expose     those false beliefs hiding behind each excuse.
    15. SIGN UP FOR AN EVENT
       Let’s face it, exercising just for the sake of exercising or losing weight can get boring.     Spice things up by signing up for an event like a run/walk race or a cycling ride where     you can be part of a team. Doing so gives your workouts a new purpose, and it’s fun       to be around others who are exercising just like you not to mention that most events     benefit nonprofit organizations, which doubles your feel-good high.

    SHARING THIS QUICK AND EASY HEALTHY RECIPES

    ” EASY CHICKEN CACCIATORE ”

    INGREDIENTS :

    – 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
    – 
    2 pounds chicken thighs and/or drumsticks, skinned (8 pieces)
    – 
    1/4 teaspoon kosher salt or sea salt
    – 
    1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    – 2 tablespoons olive oil

    – 4 small carrots, peeled and cut crosswise into thirds
    – 3 stalks celery, cut crosswise into quarters
    – 1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
    – 8 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
    – 1/4 cup tomato paste
    – 1 cup reduced sodium chicken broth
    – 1 cup dry red wine or cranberry juice
    – 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
    – 6 medium plum tomatoes, coarsely chopped
    – 1 tablespoon snipped fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed
    – 2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese
    – 2 tablespoons snipped fresh flat-leaf parsleyHOW TO PREPARE

    1. Spread flour in a shallow dish. Season chicken pieces with the salt and pepper. Dip          chicken in the flour, turning to coat evenly and gently shaking off excess.
    2. In a 5-quart Dutch oven, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add chicken pieces; cook        about 6 minutes or until browned, turning occasionally.
    3. Remove chicken from Dutch oven; set aside. Drain off fat, reserving 2 tablespoons in      the Dutch oven. Add carrots, celery, onion, and garlic. Cook about 5 minutes or just        until onion is tender, stirring occasionally.
    4. Stir in tomato paste. Add broth, wine, and vinegar; bring to boiling. Add tomatoes          and thyme. Return chicken to Dutch oven. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer,            covered, for 60 to 70 minutes or until chicken and vegetables are tender.
    5. To serve, place chicken, vegetables, and cooking juices on a serving platter. Sprinkle      with Parmesan cheese and parsley.

    NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION

    • Serving size: 2 pieces chicken with 1⅔ cups vegetable sauce mixture
    • Per serving: 407 calories; 13 g fat(3 g sat); 6 g fiber; 30 g carbohydrates; 32 g protein; 99 mcg folate; 109 mg cholesterol; 11 g sugars; 12,120 IU vitamin A; 35 mg vitamin C; 123 mg calcium; 4 mg iron; 600 mg sodium; 1,217 mg potassium
    • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (242% daily value), Vitamin C (58% dv), Folate (25% dv), Iron (22% dv)

 

 

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